About your Search

20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
basis in either technology or economics, but on the other hand, i guess my standard isn't as high in the sense that when either a judge or a regulatory commission makes a generally pro-competitive decision, that's good news. because that's better than what they normally do. and so i believe that divestiture was an important event, one of many that have caused the american telecommunications system really to be the envy of the world. its performance is the best in the world and the reason it's most competitive. >> host: paul barbagallo. >> professor noll, you'd mentioned that there were some errors that judge green made. what were some of those errors? >> guest: well, the premise -- judge green believed something that at&t argued prior to at&t's change of heart to go along with the divestiture which was that the weak sister, the old bell system, was the local operate oing companies. and so in the divestiture there are, it's sort of silly at this time to go into the details because most of them are irrelevant today. but what he did, whenever there was a close call, the divestiture d
that there are cheaper technological solutions to our national security problem and the most obvious exponents of this is drones and other remote wrote -- invading a country, you can just the public perceives and many of thes received drone along its border. there's a fascinating strategic conversation about whether that is correct and will work out over time. there's also as anyone who has worked in this field knows, the fact that technology is rather expensive and that also justifies the need for an endless growing budget if your security is completely dependent on keeping your high tech offense ahead of both lower tech defense your adversaries will navigate against you. so technology is put forward and believed by the public to be a budget panacea but it is not. the third point that should be made about appetite is -- i would go further and say we saw in this election at the presidential level and the congressional level went across party lines and effort to make candidates pay for expressing willingness to cut pentagon spending and had zero effect and the massive infusion of corporate cont
policy, whether government should support business ventures in new technologies that are unable to secure private funding. government appears to be worse at this than private markets from the records we have over the past five years. in contrast in a speech in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company it makes it harder for solar technology generally because the other entrepreneurs in the solar field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government put half a billion dollars into one of its choice. excellent question. i wrote this book because we are not just spending half a billion dollars. we are spending $12 billion a year to make electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that is $6 billion in tax breaks and $6 billion in direct expenditures. the green jobs that makes no sense and has low-income americans, we brainwash our children to think that green is good and fink uncritically about green products and green jobs and yet we can
as advances in military and defense technology. from last week, this runs just over an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. my name is gideon and i'm the editor of foreign affairs and it is a wonderful privilege and honor and pleasure to be here again at the halifax from. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussions by knowledgeable people with important issues, free and frank exchanges on the most important questions out there and that's actually the same business that halifax is and so we are delighted to be the media sponsor, and it is going to be fantastic weekend. let me just cut right to the chase. we have a fantastic panel, and more importantly, a great topic and a wonderful group with all of you as well and so let's get right to it. our panelists here, david singer of "the new york times," the former undersecretary deputy secretary of state for global affairs now a fellow at the center at harvard. the head of telefax holders distinguished sibling, the munich security conference where they have a great group. the point of the session is to do some big thinking on
and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a huge challenge. we have a much larger body of sensitive and potentially damaging information to protect in most cou
for systems for r an d. science and technology. the benchmark needed in western pacific. there's a whole pan plea of means which we will rebalance. ships are important they are good measure. there's more as we look forward the future and we meet the requirements of our defense strategic guidance in the regard. so having laid that out, i commend that to you as our future and how we see things today as we prepare our budget for fiscal year 14. it's to support the theafort i mentioned to you. i think we're on track and prepared to meet our national security commitment to the regard and the defense strategic guidance. thank you very much. i look forward to your questions. [applause] your article in foreign policy speaks to balancing the force. how do international navies play in to your stag -- strategy? >> the international navy play in to the descrat gi by mission. i think and by alliances that we've had. let me speak to the alliance. i just spoke to the western pacific, the japanese maritime self-defense force plays a we cooperate with them to share what we call long range track mission there
a major, new bold investment program, going into a new market, expanding a new technology, ect., you are worried about what the tax rate will be when that's generates cash in nine years. the best thing to do is create a lower rate, an expectation that there's not giant tax increases later. >> i agree with that. i think we should do in, but, a, you know we have the highest statutory right and no higher than average effective rates because we have the narrowest base of owl corporate income in the world. >> yeah. >> one of the reasons we have that system is because people like us argued for many years that the more efficient thing, the more, the better way to encourage investment was not to cut the corporate rate, but to have massively accelerated depreciation, expansion of investment, focusing on incentives rather than cutting the rate overall. i think the intuition is changing, but the way we're going it cut the rate is not by closing loopholes, but come out a painful expansions of the base like getting rid of accelerated depreciation and things which have a value so i think -- >> is
technology for these people, especially the young people, who um, are trying to find a way to build a better life. and broadband can be an enabler there. so from a philanthropic perspective, we've also been trying to direct some of our efforts that way as well. but postally from a pricing -- mostly from a pricing perspective, we're trying to make it as affordable as possible for these people to get broadband. >> cost is one deterrent. is lack of a computer, digital literacy, what are some of the other issues -- >> guest: that's absolutely an issue. access to computers for, um, young people in the home is a real issue. in some homes in urban, poor areas, they don't have the digital literacy that you thought about, -- that you talk about, and that's a broader issue. we've been working more on a state-by-state basis within windstream. the usta has been very involved with that, carrying on dialogue with the fcc on how we might help there, but we've got a lot of work to do there. >> host: paul gardner -- or jeff gardner, when it comes to mobile broadband, is that included in the access america pl
, but fundamentally, it's an empowering technology for these people, especially the young people who are trying to find a way to build a life, and broadband is an enabler there. from a philanthropic perspective, we are directing efforts that way as well, but mostly, from a pricing perspective, we're trying to make it as affordable as possible for these people to get broadband. >> now, cost is one deterrent. is the lack of a computer, digital literacy, what are the other issues? >> guest: i think that's absolutely an issue. access to computers for young people in the home is a real issue. in some homes, in urban poor areas, they don't -- they don't have the digital literacy you talked about, and that's a broader issue. we've been working on more on a state-by-state basis within wind stream. the usta involved in that, carrying on dialogue with the fcc on how we help there, but there's a lot of work to do that. >> host: paul gardner -- or jeff gardner, when it comes to mobile broadband, is that included in the access america plan, the broadband plan? >> guest: it is. i mean they contemplate all ki
cain in ohio, and came within two points. the technology included the so-called system, which was the republican get out the vote technology to ensure we targeted people to get to the polls. that imploded. i'm told on election day, actually, so many hits from around the country as it should have saying, gee, this person voted, this person didn't, target calls, thought it was under attack, and closed down. for those of you here from, again, the technology field with the politics, we, republicans, want to talk to you. [laughter] we need help. the democrat system is calledded gordon, it was effective at microtargetting, and i heard a lot of antedotes, and you'll love somebody gets a call who is a democrat in law school, and it was gee, you know, we see that you have voted, this information is public available. we see you voted at two o'clock on election day, but your sister, at two lane, has not voted, could you call her? that's the level at which they were dealing, whereas, you know, we were flying blind at that point. part of it is technology, and part of a turnout that was imp
prepared for the possibility. >> just to follow of that and the technology peace, we can be hammered with the potential of drones but can we push too far with technology 15 years of untamed osama bin laden is that possible with drones and the cia how much gets inside of a massive amount to do that? stock about notes and careers jones will not find those and a critical information was collected by active computing but by hands. how possible is it to combat terrorism if it is not fixed on a map if we don't have partners or allies are human beings on the ground then what is the point*? >> you are clearly right. when they did not a decisive enough is the reconstitution of humans by networks all over the world. the cost of those is nothing compared to five nuclear submarines to the military budget. i think we can and to maintain the collection and analysis process in our about -- military without breaking the budget. and the best way to get the most out of the military force but when we faint on those lines we don't want to toss out the jt's of having an army even though we may not have a
honestly is the lack of an overall information technology architecture you and i have talked about this before, and it still doesn't exist today as far as i know. i've pointed that out and my committee has pointed that out and outside they've looked at the va's i.t. department and have pointed that out. i'm just not convinced that five years from now given that i don't know where you will be, but my fear is that we are going to be sitting here talking about the same issue again because we are not going about it with the discipline i come from an information technology career of over 30 years. i worked at u.s. special operations command as the director of the staff i know what it takes to get this stuff done, and five years, gentleman is totally unacceptable. and i don't really have a question for you. i just want you to fix this for crying out loud. >> can i respond? congressmen coming you and i but primarily roger baker and you have had this discussion. i work with you and we believe we have the good mark on architecture and i haven't satisfied you. we will come back and work on i
, the peaceful march across the world across the parched land and the dense rain forest of the congo. technology is transforming thicks. everything is speeding up. everything is opening up. now if i can talk about something i actually know about for a moment. this feeling reminds me a little bit maybe more than a little bit of the arrival of punk rod in the '70s. you see, the clash or the baffs of the rock and roll pyramid, and overnight gave the finger to the dreadful business, the top of the pyramid, it was called progressive rock. open sick songs. no good lyrics. [laughter] great reviews. [laughter] punk bands made no pretends of being better than the audience. they were the audience. if you. ed to play, grab a guitar. energy was in. the clash like a public service announcement with guitars. and they gave u12 2u2 that social act vifm could make as a musical rite. i like to point out that none of your professor, not a single one has ever drawn or likely to draw the connection between the arab spring and the clash. [laughter] [applause] just a little intermission. and okay. sharpen your pencils
of the information technology boom, creation of private credit and, therefore, rapid increase in tax revenues. and so what stephanie showed, this was something that was not forecast at the time. at the time those who were there in 2000 remember that the secretary of the treasury at the time was -- and the chairman of the federal reserve -- were talking about a 13-year horizon for the complete elimination of the public debt. and the congressional budget office was not forecasting that the information technology boom was an aberration that would come to an end, but it did. and from 2000 forward we were back into the much more normal position of the united states government running substantial budget deficits. and as the private sector rebuilt its financial position. so that's the first point is that long-term forecasts, the idea that one can control the future position of the debt and the deficit by actions taken today is an extremely tenuous and debatable idea. second point is that there are certain assumptions being made which create extremely ostensibly scary scenarios. those numbers that show and,
defense technology. should we have discussion about this defense strategy? >> a couple thoughts. you say how do we invest domestic affairs, money we don't have. depending on the nature of the deal to raise revenue, basically you are saying money you are not spending will be available for the purpose of public investment depends on the larger parameters of the budget deal. as for waste in the pentagon mentioned whether my colleagues for a percentage on, it is the and pervasive and depends how you define it. if you are buying a weapon you down need, i would say yes. there are smaller waist in terms of procurement policy and so forth, but that is the key target. we could do a whole panel on an alternate strategy but it is clear that on nuclear weapons, preparing for counterinsurgency and the overly optimistic sense of what we can do with drones and naval power. of these are things to consider but we could have a whole conference on it. >> one barry specific way of thinking about waste is during this period of growth that the slide shows, there was astronomical growth in contracting and the
and more of them. we keep pulling the resources out. is where technology can be really an important and powerful vehicle. i think initially we had to vent -- said several minutes of these people and we have data at about 50,000. i think they've done a lot, put up huge effort trying to improve that. >> we are at a time in the administration, the second term of the administration were question of legacy often comes into play. people start talking about what will this administration be remembered for. so i kind of wonder what you, if you have the opportunity, which he did when you're were in office, at least two of the dead and maybe the others had the opportunity, if this president and the secretary of state, a 20 minute conversation about public diplomacy and what could be done that was particularly useful to leave something behind for years from now, what would be, what kind of things would you bring up? just to give you time to think about, let me remind, the bush administration under secretary glassman together with microsoft and a bunch of other people put together a conference o
. trying to use new, smart technology, that kind of stuff, pretending to get solutions and at the same time, let's say the political diplomatic approach doesn't provide solution in the end. so, isn't it a signal that we are shifting from her politics and diplomacy and rely on tools of solutions. >> is the war on terror divided into a problem rather than addressing the more fundamental issues that might have led to the spread in popularity of chiapas in the first place? >> i certainly think the footprint strategy is intended to do exactly what the questioner is suggesting here, which is simply one of containment, but to do without sending in 100,000 troops and accepting a chilling doublers along the way. but you think about the american reaction to 9/11, 9/11 cost the attackers may be have been dollars of "the new york times" went about trying to do an assessment at the 10 year anniversary of what we spend in total in reaction to 9/11. everything from rebuilding the buildings to the wars in afghanistan and iraq to homeland security and so forth. the number we came up with was $3.3 trillion i
was put in place in 1992. it was to be a temporary measure. it was going to boost the new technology. 20 years later, president obama's respected energy secretary says wind is a mature technology. and what have we got after 20 years and billions of dollars of subsidies? a puny amount of unreliable electricity. our country uses nearly 25% of all the electricity in the world. wind produces 3% of that. of course, it only produces it when the wind blows. it's not easy to store it. so it is of limited use in a country that needs huge amounts of low-cost, clean, reliable electricity. relying on wind power is the energy equivalent of going to war in sailboats when nuclear submarines are available. the wind subsidy is so large, mr. president, that wind developers are now paying distributors to take their wind power under cutting the base load energy plants that are necessary to provide the reliable electricity we need for the country. and on top of that, there are better ways to produce clean electricity, better ways than subsidizing a technology that destroys the environment in the name of savi
a lot of people talk about the science technology. >> engineering. >> engineering and math. right. [laughter] i do think -- i am all for studying all these interesting things, but i do think that having those kinds of skills -- the countries we worry about competing with us a lot of their focus is on those things that actually have real world usefulness in the economy, and germany for a long time i spent a reasonable amount of time in germany they've emphasized engineering and technical backgrounds and certainly china is doing it and as i said i'm also with historians and even economists. [laughter] but i do think that having a strong base of people with those kind of skills would be a great thing. >> i think the most important point is education matters a lot. if you look at the unemployment break down in the u.s. right now it is skewed very much to words high school graduates are sort of a range of numbers but i think it's around 13, 14%. and as you get up past high school graduate, college graduate advanced degree it drops precipitously in the there is a gap we have right now i
of their semester papers. this undergirded american military strategy of using weapons and technology to thoroughly pummel the enemy before a single american soldier was sent into battle. the war also exposed the fact that japan, which adopted some of the capitalistic production methods seen in america, lacked the essential pillars of exceptionalism to employ them fully in wartime. without free speech, free markets, constitutional protections that allowed great inventers and businessmen to try new ideas and fail without punishment, japan fell behind the u.s. almost instabilitily. in four years of war, the u.s. produced 17 fleet carriers. japan, one. we go into, for example, um, two guys viewed as failures or at least not very successful guys, and that would be ann true jackson -- andrew jackson higgins who produced an incredible number of craft, landing craft, but after the war was kind of harassed out of business. but especially we look at people like howard hughes. how'd houston was this giant -- howard hughes was this giant failure in world war ii. he produces these wooden reconnaissance airplan
imaginable. i was a dream child. today with the marvels of technology designed by america, they get to watch these. they taught me to dream. they taught me to never give up. my father instilled in me to never have any master. my mother instilled in me the need to care and protect those weaker than i care they taught me the virtue of confidence, even at the expense of the perception of arrogance. the top intimate the most of every second of life and i'm proud to say that it does not as much as humanly possible. i live in australia and traveled to america frequently. if i could move here tomorrow, i would. it may sound strange, but i have often felt that if i were an american trapped in an australian body. [laughter] such as my empathy and depreciation of american culture and a culture of optimism, support. don't get me wrong. i love my country and i'm prepared to pay the ultimate sacrifice for it. i owe almost all that i am to australia. it is a magnificent country and perhaps the greatest for those that wish to read lives in color between the length of the appetite for risk or attempting the
mccain in ohio and still came within two points. the technology included so-called orca system. some of you maybe read about that in the last couple days which was the republican get-out-the-vote technology to insure that we were targeting people getting to the polls. it imploded on election day. it got so many hits from around the country as it should have saying gee this person voted. this person didn't vote. target calls. we thought it was under attack and closed down. so for those of you here from, again, the technology field and with interest in politics, we republicans want to talk to you. [laughter] we need some help. the democrats system i think is called gorton was quite effective at microtargeting. i heard a lot of anecdotes. i heard one this morning that you will love. someone gets a call a democrat in law school. gee, we see you voted. by the way this information is publicly voted. it is at 2:00 on election, but your sister at tulane has not voted, could you call her? that east the level which they were dealing we frankly were flying blind at that point. part of it is tec
of the institute for science, law and technology at the illinois institute of technology and she has also served to the u.s. government on ethical issues, regarding new technologies. our second father is hannah rosin. she has written a book called "the end of men and the rise of women." she documents the levels of men and women in every society and the implications for marriage, sex, children, work, and a whole lot more. using research and original reporting, she finds women and men from every stratum of class, education and culture, behaving in ways that point to an upended social order. she is also a senior editor at the atlantic and a founder of the women's section. last but not least, jow walsh in "what is the matter with white people." she argues that the fundamental divide is not about party or ideology, or even about race. but about how each side believes that we got here. too many americans today think that they got where they are without any help. this fundamental misunderstanding is at the heart of why so many white class voters have issues. please help me welcome these three fantastic
of government response, that technology is really just a piece of the answer. you need to have technology on your networks help identify when there's a breach to give you much greater understanding about what's happening on your networks, to look for these intrusions and these incursions into your network. that is a piece of the solution, and part of it is the caller said is really having the discussion with nations that are aggressively pursuing this. there are dozens of countries have these electronic espionage capabilities in place. a specific programs where they're targeting western networks exfiltrate data to empower their private sector, to empower their manufacturing base, the retail base, the research and development programs. they're doing at the expense of the american taxpayer. >> host: where is congress on the cybersecurity legislation? >> guest: there are more than 40 bills right now that are on the hill. covering a whole range of cybersecurity issues. some of these bills have been bouncing around for five years or more. and i recognize understand it's an incredibly complex i
that owned millvinia but there would be no way to know for sure. 20 first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i just wanted to say something about the book that made me think, but here in texas, looking at its history, particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas among regular people because as the land was given away the mexican government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and
. this undergirded american military strategy of using weapons and technology to thoroughly pummeled the enemy before an american soldier was sent into battle. the were also exposed the package of japan, which adopted some of the capitalistic reduction methods seen in america, lacked the essential pillars of exceptionalism to employ them fully and more time. without free speech, free market, constitutional protection of the great inventors and businessmen to try new ideas and feel without punishment japan fell behind the u.s. almost instantly. and for your support, the u.s. produced 15 fleet carriers. japan won. we go into, for example, two guys viewed as failures or at least not very successful guys and that would be andrew jackson higgins who produced an incredible number of craft, a landing craft after the war was harassed them out of business. especially look at people like howard hughes. howard hughes views this giant failure during world war ii because he doesn't produce any weapons that work. he produces what reconnaissance airplanes. since the whole point. people like howard hughes were neces
think drones are an amazing piece of technology that the u.s. has, but if used judiciously and wisely can i think make a big difference in the work and so qaeda. however, instead of being a part of the solution, they become the totality for the obama administration and i think you're right that people in washington look at yemen and cms and yemen house for a number officials become too hard to do. easiest thing is drones are perfect, so let's do that. i think a very real but unspoken assumption underlying all of this was really brought out over the past month as they went to yemen and back to the united states is that the u.s. seems to believe that this is a war the u.s. can win on its own and i think that's wrong and i think that's a mistake. if this is the u.s. against al qaeda and yemen, if it's framed that way come to seem that way, that's where the u.s. can never win. the only people who ever defeat al qaeda are the yemeni shiites coming in the clerics and so forth. the u.s. can do a lot to help them. unfortunately see right now is the u.s. that is so heavy handedly encouraging t
getting a transportation bill. it's a combination of things. modern technology, frankly it is a 24/7 news media. it is the fact that the members leave their families back home. you can't be a good legislator two and half days a week. you have to work at it. the combination of those things, it contributed to the partisanship and the gridlock that we have now. the answer is simple. it is called leadership. men and women of goodwill, conservative liberals, republicans, and the president -- they say it is an easy and we have to get results. >> so i want to come back to that. let's talk about the challenges that lay ahead over the next three to six months in the government. you have divided power, fiscal problems that you have to address. it's not unlike 1990. you are able to put together a pretty good package in 1990 that led to pave the way for it the deficit subsequently. something like that happen now? what was so different about 1990 than what we have now? >> well, i think it would be more difficult to do it. i came to the senate in january of 1977. when i came there, you had democrats an
within two points. the technology included the so-called orca system. many of you have read about that in the last couple of days, which was the republican get out the vote technology to ensure that we were targeting people getting to the polls. i'm told on election day actually got so many hits around the country as it should have from people saying this person voted this person didn't vote, they thought it was under attack and close down. so for those of you here from again detect elegies field and with interest in politics, we republicans want to talk to you. we need some help. the democratic system i think is called gordon was actually quite effective at mike retargeting. i heard one this morning it was. somebody get the call who is a democrat, who is in law school and police chief, we see you have voted. the information is publicly available. it's at 2:00 on election day, but your sister at tulane has not voted. could you call her? that is the level at which they were dealing, whereas we frankly were flying blind at that point. part of it is to elegy and not lead to a turnout
and technology and the arts and it was thanks to the division of the accomplished author and journalist walter isaacson who's the ceo of the aspen institute who approached the owner of the of cleantech, david bradley, about partnering to create a new event called the has been ideas festival. in less than a decade, the house and ideas festival takes place every summer in the beautiful aspin campus in colorado has become an influential leader in the global event arena. for the success we decided four years ago to take elements of that great show on the road and with the partnership of general and the newseum, the washington ideas for rahm was born. you'll hear the greatest journalists interviewed felt makers and leaders to discuss topics as varied the future of the entrepreneur should, global health, education, the future of china and many more subjects. so if you bear with me i would just like to offer some words of appreciation or the organizations and people that have made this event possible. it starts at the top of the list with a big thank you to margaret is the editorial director of the w
with the fact that he is clearly of german technology and remote targeting a suspected terrorist sense to me that a lot of people's expectations ass asserted a pact leaning president were misguided. nothing illustrates that were then his decision to go after osama bin laden. now when i talk about the characters in the story, you'll forgive me because i don't thing about these things in the way that scholars to her may be that you would doing an analysis for the military. i am a storyteller. so to me if interested in the arc of care nurse. so you've got admiral mccray then who goes from a wheelchair months after 9/11, who gets an opportunity to work in the white house as a consultant, probably because somebody is looking out for him because they know he can't perform physically anymore. as a result, starts thinking strategically, plus what is learned about special operations in his study of special ops to the problem of al qaeda. it is not by coincidence that he ends up becoming second-in-command and then succeeds general mcchrystal is the commander said that when the time comes to launch thi
technology or delivery system reform or something solves the problem, which is quite conceivable, is it really urgent that we try to settle this problem to the extent that it's a problem between now and the holidays or in the spring of 2013? again, i think the rational person would ask, you know, this is kind of like saying, well, you know, your parents had cancer when they were 60, so at the age of 20 you should go ahead and have an operation just in case, right? just to make sure. it might develop in 30 or 40 years. well, then why is it -- and this is, ultimately, a political question. it's not an economic question. why is anyone talking about fixing social security and medicare in the next six months? or the next, for that matter, five or six weeks? as part of a grand bargain? why are you even discussing this? and even if there were a few irrational people saying things, why would anyone take it seriously? i think this shows the answer. this is one of the ways that you can cut social security benefits that have been discussed as a possible part of the grand bargain. monique me
technology? [laughter] >> let's take three more questions. the three people who are in line. >> mr. wolfe, um, i'm a native miamian, and thanks to you about 20 years ago there were three gentlemen running across i-95, um, asking if they could help my husband and i. and i knew what was going down having read "bonfire of the vanities." they weren't coming to help me at all. [laughter] and we were robbed at gunpoint. but i've since lived here for a long time and raised three children, and it's a wonderful city. i love miami, and i just wondered after you having done your research and meeting all these interesting characters that we clearly have no shortage of here, if it's the kind of place that you think you could live. >> well, i think there's no blanket statement that i think i could make because there's such variety in miami. i don't know these statistics for single mothers and things like that, you probably do, but it's, it's such a complicated, it's really such a complicated subject. but it wouldn't hurt people to cut down a little bit, seems to me. >> do you think you could live here? do
and that helped. it's the spirit and technology of the internet. >> and i suppose everybody saw this going on amazon.com and look at every binders in the thousands and thousands of comments. this finder just doesn't hope my comments. >> priority for standardized effect is. there are no women in it. >> was speaking associate media, one of the questions is prompted by treat from election evening. when we realize we had part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that su
of reasons related to technology, related to globalization. and what i think is important about the proposal is that by asking the top 2% to pay more, that will provide more opportunity to have others have the same type of changes they had. what is the extra revenue going to be used for? to help keep student loan rates low. it's going to be used to provide stem education, science, technology, math metic, engineering education for more individuals to have the kinds of opportunities that have knead possible for so many americans to thrive. and if you look what is happened to the distribution of income in the u.s. over the last thirty years, we have seen the top pull away. it's wonderful they have done so well. what's important is that we pursue the policy that will reduce this opportunity gap and provide nor opportunity for those from the middle and lower income families. >> do you think that ten years from today our budget deficit is likely to be under $500 billion a year? what would you project the budget deficit going to be? we're running a $1.1 trillion right now. where do you think it wil
to the poll. mitt romney got fewer than john mccain and still came within two points. the technology included the so-called system some of you have maybe read about in the last couple of days which was the republican get-out-the-vote technology to ensure people are getting to the polls. i'm told on election day it had so many hits around the country as it should have from people saying this person voted and this person didn't. but if that was under attack it closed down. so for those of you hear from again that technology field to enter some politics, we republicans want to talk to you. [laughter] we need some help. the democratic system was quite effective at micro targeting and i've heard lots of anecdotes and one this morning that you will love that somebody gets a call that's a democrat from law school and was we see that you voted and disinformation is publicly available. was it you that voted 2:00 on election day but your sister hasn't. can you call her. that's the level at that point. that led to a turnout effort that in the end makes the difference. the increase in turnout among the b
the western pacific within a doctrine of the systems for r&d and science and technology and by means which we will rebalanced the ships were important to meet our strategic guidance in this regard. i commend that to you as the future and how we see things today as we prepare our budget for fiscal year 14 if the support in this very a4a that i mentioned to you in this regard in the defense and strategic guidance. thank you very much and i look forward to your questions. [applause] how do they plan to your strategy? >> mission by mission i think and by alliances that we have had, and let me speak to the alliance. i just spoke to the western pacific. the japanese maritime self-defense force plays that we cooperate with them to share what we call long-range search and track mission and the mission there in korea this should interest to continue to do that in a similar manner so the alliance as we have we are taking those. with regard to the kind of policies in the gulf of aden they played a major part we have a major collision maritime force that is called 151 in the gulf of the damage has been l
views of education in america, this marriage of traditional classrooms with digital technology and has been employing them in a way that flipped our traditional model of education. >> in by the way salmon khan appeared on our "after words" program so if he wants to watch that author on booktv.org just type in his name. a long history between 12 and christopher hitchens. >> we published christopher in 2007. is the second but we published and number one "new york times" bestseller. after that book we published his first memoir, "hitch 22" followed last september by a collection called arguably. which also went to be a bestseller. under extreme circumstances, he was very ill at the time. we had hoped to publish a book, and longer book about his illness and ultimately we collected many of the pieces that he wrote for "vanity fair." greg carter wrote an introduction for the book and is widow carol blue wrote a beautiful afterwards piece. >> you will be at the miami book fair next week, november 17 and 18th along with carol blue and art name is, right? >> that's going to be an interesting pa
making sure that our workers are getting the degrees they need, including in science, technology, engineering and math, we should be doing much or at the high school level with one and two years decrease. the opportunity of immigration reform that came out loud and clear through this election where you have now 10% of the electorate, hispanic 75% of them voting for the president and you are already hearing many other republicans starting to talk about the possibility of moving on immigration reform. so there are some real opportunities that will move our economy along. if we can compromise a get together on debt, do something insist on tax reform, and then work on these problems like energy, comprehensive energy problems that are opportunity and making. so i am much were optimistic than some. imagine hubert humphrey. actually the original he gave me gordon humphrey suggested by mistake or little-known senator from new hampshire. but eventually they corrected it. >> the president has just given a press covers but i do not get the chance to hear it but he was sounding feisty on the
a company called cultivated risk. we do projects that combined humor and technology to sell better stories, make the world less horrible. so day job permanent job, and between sleep job. it's all i think about. i want to be one of those makers, not one of the stickers >> how has having a black president affected your work? >> well, it gives me one other job that is accessible now, which is great. you can add that to the list of the ag and athletes and sassy black woman, also president. that is pretty cool. expanded the range. it is a fun and proud image. it also created some challenges. president obama as a symbol of massive racial progress is often overstated. so it makes the argument more complicated. our work here is finished as america in the great racial project of equal opportunity. it really isn't, and so having a black president is a shortcut to avoid the difficult conversations and work that we still have to do as a nation. great progress has been achieved, but there is still so much more to go. obama is at challenging figure. he makes us to more than we really have. >> how to be
change and the technological innovation that we will need in order to ultimately adjust and adapt to what we have already done. the carbon tax also raises revenue in a way that could be used for a variety of different forms but it has an additional kind of benefit associated with. the narrow political discussion that we are having today. >> we see the gasoline prices coming down because the price of oil starts to fall because of all the activity produced in this country may be that would be an opportunity to increase the federal gasoline tax if we don't go to a full carbon tax. with 50 cents a gallon of the federal tax. some of the problem is from a climate perspective transportation and gasoline price petroleum is a small share of the problem. the problem is in the energy sector and without the carbon tax you are not directly getting at that. >> so, i think for the reasons that have been described the carbon tax makes enormous sense to deal with the environmental impact of energy use to like and you can design one in such a way that doesn't cause much harm for the american industries tha
, biofuels, clean energy research and the technologies of tomorrow and factories to build the stuff in the united states. not just energy, but the stimulus is going to drag our antiquated health care system into the digital era so that your doctor might not kill you at this chicken scratch handwriting by 2015 just about every american will have an electronic medical record, which really should improve care and reduce costs and is really a down payment on health care reform. this included the most ambitious education reform in decades with race to the top of the largest infrastructure investment since eisenhower. it had the largest research investment other, the largest middle-class tax cut since reagan went to more than 95% of the country in less than 10% of the country noticed it. with great politics. so again my book i did try to get deep into the bowels of the white house in the backroom of capitol hill, but also tried to be a fly on the wall and the energy energy departments weatherization division. it's actually known as the turkey farm. i went to local high-speed rail meetings
always recognized the critical role technology plays in these rescue efforts. from the amber alert to his spearheading the launch of the national center's cyber tip line in 1998, this so-called 9/11 for the internet is a clearing center for reports of crimes against children on the internet and so far has received more than 1.5 million reports. ernie is a lawyer and a member of the kentucky bar. he is also a teacher, having held faculty positions at the university of louisville, the university of kentucky, and indiana university. he's been honored by his alma matter,the university of louisville as a distinguished alumnus of the louis brandeis school of law and is an outstanding alumnus of the cheng of arts and sciences. i'm pleased to report to my colleagues that ernie will not be leaving the fight for america's kids. no, his passion won't allow him to take a typical retirement. we're lucky that even as he's stepping down from his role at the helm of the center for missing and exploited children, he is a he focused exclusively on his new role as president and c.e.o. of the international c
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)